The size of your vision is more relevant than the size of your person

My son is small right now, as I write this he is 10 years old.

Just 10. That’s pretty little. No one told him that he was small though, or if they did, he certainly didn’t listen.

My son Sawyer lives his life at a 110% – we’re all just tryin to keep up!

In his mind, he is a full man, ready to take on the world, ready to go places and do things that others can only dream of. Don’t get me wrong, he’s not a delusional little guy, he knows that he’s only 10, but he hasn’t yet learned that his dreams are meant to be just “dreams.”

He hasn’t yet found out that he needs to be realistic and set goals that are achievable. He hasn’t learned that the mountain might just be too high to climb, the lake too wide to swim. He hasn’t found out that his dreams are too big to realize.

My goal is to protect him from that realization.

Sometimes people do in fact accomplish “the impossible.”

Sometimes the kid that dreams of being an astronaut gets to space. Sometimes the kid that dreams of being a race car driver wins the Le Mans.

Sometimes the kid that dreams of changing the world does, in fact, CHANGE THE WORLD.

Why do we lose that belief that we can accomplish our dreams? Why do we squash it out of young people? What good does that really do?

All too often we crush the dreams of the dreams simply because we aren’t living our own.

Face it, we have been too lazy, too slow, with too little belief in ourselves to do anything with our lives, and dang it, we don’t want anyone else to reach ‘theirs’ either. If they do, it only makes it more apparent we gave up too soon, we didn’t try hard enough, or even at all.

Of course, we don’t really think of it quite like that, but at the end of the day that’s what it really is, isn’t it?

If my kid wants to create a billion-dollar company doing something amazing that hasn’t been done before, why the heck would I tell him to “be more realistic?”

If my daughter wants to create incredible pieces of art for fun, why would I stop her?

If my son wants to become a professional soccer player, why would I discourage that?

Why the hell would I discourage their dreams? Are they no amazing artists, founders of billion-dollar companies, or professional soccer players? Of course there are, and all of them were just little kids with big dreams at one point in their lives.

It doesn’t mean they’ll reach them, it also doesn’t mean they have failed if and when they don’t. The value of a person has nothing to do with their dreams or those dreams being realized.

But dang, what a shame for all the kids that were told “be more realistic” instead of “wow, you want to do that, awesome, let me help you learn how.”

Just because you’re small, just because you’re young, or even just because you’re big or old, doesn’t mean that you’re limited.

You’re limited only by the lack of belief in yourself, your value, and your ability to do something incredible.

The size of your vision is far more important than the size of your person.

Onward,

Chris Behnke

Inspiration from the Instagram post:
https://www.instagram.com/p/BT-u4FejapB/?hl=en&taken-by=chrisbehnke

The size of your vision is more relevant than the size of your person.

My son Sawyer (9) has grand vision and the passion, drive, and energy to back it up. My goal is to teach, encourage, and empower.

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